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Viewing: Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

7 results found.

Image of A globe to live on! - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

A globe to live on! - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson Library December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. Publisher: H.R. Robinson The Whigs objected to the Democratic Party's use of federal office holders including postal workers, census takers and other government employees to distribute the Extra Glove and other pro-Van Buren campaign literature. They also criticized Amos Kendall, Extra Globe editor and former Postmaster General, for sharing in the profits of the Extra Glove with Globe editor, Francis Preston Blair (left).

Image of Expansion and contraction as witnessed in the Senate March 5, 1840 during Mr. Buchanan's remarks on currency. - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

Expansion and contraction as witnessed in the Senate March 5, 1840 during Mr. Buchanan's remarks on currency. - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson Library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. Publisher: H.R. Robinson A contrast of two influential Democrats, the obese Alabama Representative Dixon Hall Lewis and gaunt "Globe" editor Francis Preston Blair. The artist comments upon the unlikely alliance established in early 1840 between the Van Buren administration and certain Southern legislators in the circle of John Calhoun. Insinuation of Blair's corruption is also made. Lewis sits on a bench, holding his hat and walking stick before him. Blair embraces him with claw-like hands, saying, "I think Buchanan [i.e., Democratic sen

Image of The Globe-man after hearing of the Vote on the Sub-Treasury Bill - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

The Globe-man after hearing of the Vote on the Sub-Treasury Bill - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. In response to the Panic of 1837, Van Buren proposed the creation of an Independent Treasury separate from any bank. The Bill provided for the establishment of Sub-Treasuries in major cities around the country, so it was known as the Sub-Treasury Bill. It was defeated by Congress in 1838. In this caricature of Blair, the artist exaggerates his wrinkles and protruding forehead to make him appear worn and haggard. True caricature such as this was unusual for political cartoons of the time. Cartoonists were more likely to draw the faces of

Image of The globe man listening to Webster's Speech, on the Specie Circular - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

The globe man listening to Webster's Speech, on the Specie Circular - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. Andrew Jackson issued the Specie Circular in 1836 requiring purchasers of government land in the west to pay for it with gold or silver, known as the specie or "hard money", as opposed to paper bank notes or "soft money". The order proved to be very unpopular. The Whig Senator Daniel Webster, a skilled orator, spoke passionately in Congress against Van Buren's monetary policies. Publisher: H.R. Robinson

Image of The man wot pays no postage - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

The man wot pays no postage - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. Publisher: H.R. Robinson James Reeside (left) was a successful stagecoach line operator who contracted with the post office to transport mail. Under Postmaster General William Barry, the post office ran into financial problems and could not pay its contractors. Reeside lent large sums of money to the post office to help them pay what they owed. When Amos Kendall (seated) became Postmaster General, he refused to repay Reeside, who sued to recover the money. In 1841, Reeside was awarded $190,000 by a jury.

Image of The Secretary of War presenting a stand of Colours to the 1st Regiment of Republican Bloodhounds - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

The Secretary of War presenting a stand of Colours to the 1st Regiment of Republican Bloodhounds - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. The second Seminole War, begun during Andrew Jackson's presidency, was a costly and unpopular effort to remove Seminole Indians from their tribal lands in Florida. The seven-year campaign cost millions during a period of great economic hardship. Van Buren's Secretary of war, Joel Poinsett (left), was widely criticized for the incompetent handling of the war and for the cruelty of bringing Cuban bloodhounds to hunt the Seminoles in early 1840. Runaway black slaves had joined the Seminole communities, causing many to believe that the dogs were rea

Image of [Thomas Nast] - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

[Thomas Nast] - Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896

Cabinet photo in three-quarter profile.