Museum logo
Museum logo

Search by Creator

Search tip: Search for artists by last name.
Creators

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U V W Y Z



Viewing: Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

36 results found.

Image of Articles of Vertu (Virtue) in the Senate. - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Articles of Vertu (Virtue) in the Senate. - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Caption: Senator from Ohio. 'We have it, now let's keep it; our companions in arms do not return any of it. Senator from Vermont. 'Let us give it back as a gratuity.'

Image of Blood red sea - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Blood red sea - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Pencil note on verso: "Blood red sea. Peaceful neutrality. The position of England & France on the Suez Canal. Reproduced in Paine's Life of Nast."

Image of [Charles Francis Adams] Statesmen, No. 126/ An Arbitrator - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

[Charles Francis Adams] Statesmen, No. 126/ An Arbitrator - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Recto:Vanity Fair, October 5th, 1872. caricature of Charles Francis Adams, Statesman No. 126 Includes biographical information about Charles Adams

Image of Does this mean the indorsement of the President? - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Does this mean the indorsement of the President? - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Part of the exhibit: From Yellow Kid to Conan: American Cartoons from the International Museum of Cartoon Art, at the Hopkins Hall Gallery and Corrider, Ohio State University, June 28 - August 7, 2009

Image of Founder's Night 1898 - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Founder's Night 1898 - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

On January 30, 2009 Draper Hill stated that it was his opinion that Nast created this cartoon for a Player's Club event celebrating Edwin Booth's portrayal of Hamlet. He believed that Nast disliked his drawing of Booth in the drawing and, therefore, re-drew it before publication. Nast was the "vandal" who cut the original drawing to excise the first self-caricature. In the 1920s, Nast's son, Cyril, sent the self-caricature of Nast as a Christmas card. Draper Hill had the card copied and added the revised caricature of Booth to the piece.

Image of Let the Chinese Embrace Civilization, and They May Stay - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Let the Chinese Embrace Civilization, and They May Stay - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

"In this cartoon Nast advocates for the Chinese by condemning the Irish. This appeared during the congressional debate over the Chinese Exclusion Act. Nast asserts sarcastically that if the Chinese only acted like the Irish- drinking, begging, striking, loafing, fighting, etc.- they would become acceptably American."

Image of "Let us clasp hands over the bloody chasm."-Horace Greeley. - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

"Let us clasp hands over the bloody chasm."-Horace Greeley. - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

This engraving, published in Harper's Weekly, depicts Horace Greeley reaching over the walls of the Andersonville prison. Greeley had apparently exhorted the nation to "clasp hands" in a bid to encourage sectional reconciliation, however Nast mocked it as a cheapening of principles to bargain with the same people responsible for the 13,000 deaths at Andersonville Prison. Gratz Brown, Greeley's running mate, is reduced to a note card riding on Greeley's coat tails. In Greeley's pocket is a satirical pamphelet mocking the title of an earlier Greeley book, "What I Know About Farming," which symbolized for Nast his pretensions towards expertise.

No Image Available

Sour fruit for Foxey - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Formed part of the Gallery of Rogues: Cartoonists' Self -caricatures exhibit, January 25 - April15, 2011

Image of Statesman No. 113: The Massive Grievance - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Statesman No. 113: The Massive Grievance - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

Recto:Vanity Fair, May 25, 1872 caricature of Charles Sumner, Statesman No. 113 AC.W7.062 also includes biographical information about Charles Adams AC.W7.062a is only the image page

Image of The American River Ganges - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

The American River Ganges - Nast, Thomas, 1840-1902

reprinted in Hess and Kaplan, 'The Ungentlemanly Art,' 1968 P. 99