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Viewing: McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

96 results found.

Image of Act 2D. Home of the Astrologer and Opium Joint. Harrigan & Hart's Great Play, Investigation. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Act 2D. Home of the Astrologer and Opium Joint. Harrigan & Hart's Great Play, Investigation. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

(Page 3) Four men and a woman stand inside a poorly-kept house. The cartoon advertises a play called "Investigation", by Harrigan and Hart.

Image of Afraid Of The Election Theives. Bringing In The Ballot-Boxes From Squanxville. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Afraid Of The Election Theives. Bringing In The Ballot-Boxes From Squanxville. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

(unsigned, but probably by McDougall) Jay Gould, a notorious railroad magnate, drives a speeding horse-drawn cart carrying a heavily-armed rural family. A sign reading "No Jay-Gould in Ours!" stands in the background. The cartoon satirizes big business' support of James G. Blaine during the 1884 presidential election and accuses them of promoting voter fraud.

Image of A Gentle Reminder For The Taxpayers Of New York City. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A Gentle Reminder For The Taxpayers Of New York City. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A mass of people gather around a large Pharaoh-esque statue (possibly Theodore Roosevelt, given that it has glasses and a moustache, but unlikely; Roosevelt was in the military at the time, and his only political action that year was a failed bid for New York City's Mayor, which most likely had not begun at the time of the cartoon's publication) holding a screw marked "Taxation" and pour money into a slot ("Pay Here"); the money goes through another chute labeled "Board of Appropriations" and pours into several sacks labeled "Private", "Board of Public Works", "Police Board Boodle", "Fire Department", and "Private Plunder". In the top right corner, there are two deflated sacks labeled "Public

Image of Ajax Blaine Defying Mulligan Lightning. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Ajax Blaine Defying Mulligan Lightning. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

James G. Blaine, with several other politicians behind him (his running mate James Logan, Greenback Party nominee Benjamin Butler, industrialist Stephen Elkins, and newspaper editor Charles Dana), raises his fist in anger as a castle ("Castle Blaine") collapses due to lightning striking it (the lightning is labeled "Mulligan Letters"). Blaine is covered in tattoos referencing his various corruption scandals and other insults, specifically "Guano Statesman", "Little Rock" (a railroad company he took bribes from), "Lobbying", "Demagogism", "Northern Pacific" (another railroad company involved in his corrupt dealings), "Mulligan Letters" (the name of a scandal where his deals with the Little Roc

Image of All To "Tie Up." - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

All To "Tie Up." - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A crowd of policemen contain a riot at a streetcar station. The cartoon depicts New York City police response to a general street-car strike.

Image of A Princess Lost For Hours. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A Princess Lost For Hours. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Maria Christina of Austria, Queen of Spain, holds an infant King Alfonso XIII in her arms. The cartoon accompanies a story about an injury sustained by Isabella, Princess of Asturias, the most prominent and popular member of Spain's royal family.

Image of A Rather Unnatural And Offensive Alliance. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A Rather Unnatural And Offensive Alliance. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

An abolitionist attempts to load a cannonball ("Prohibition Note") into a cannon-sized bottle ("No Rum Or Free Rum"), which is too small to fit the ball. The "cannon" is manned by a "Rum Seller" and pointed at a set of buildings labeled "High License". The cartoon satirizes the radicalization of both sides of the prohibition movement and both side's apparant cooperation on attempting to pass favorable legislation in Congress.

Image of Artists Of The Kitchen. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Artists Of The Kitchen. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

(Page 12) A portrait of American chef and president of the American branch of the Cooks' and Pastry Cooks' Association Achille Lenz. The cartoon accompanies a story claiming that U.S. chefs are surpassing France in high cuisine.

Image of A Scene From The Senatorial Inquisition. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A Scene From The Senatorial Inquisition. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Jacob Sharp, holding an empty checkbook with "I Forget Everything" written on the side, says "I Can't Remember"; he appears to be drunk, but there is a jug labeled "Pure Milk" sitting on a counter next to him. Three men (New York Senator Roscoe Conkling, Michigan Representative Aaron T. Bliss, and an third unidentified figure) stand behind him, raising his arm. The cartoon satirizes Senatorial investigations of a corruption scandal.

Image of A Simple Suggestion--Something Neat In Wood. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A Simple Suggestion--Something Neat In Wood. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Several grinning New York City Aldermen sit in front of statues of Native Americans, black Americans, and a Scottish Highlander. A statue holds a sign that reads "We Can Not Agree". In the top right corner there is a panel ("Getting Jurymen.") depicting the Aldermen carrying the statues. The cartoon satirizes the corruption involved in selecting a jury to prosecute New York City municipal officials for corrupt practices.

Image of At A Child's Touch. The Story As Told By Our Artist - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

At A Child's Touch. The Story As Told By Our Artist - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

The front page has four small and two large cartoons; the second is divided into five panels, from top to bottom. The first small cartoon (top left) depicts a young girl (May Newton) and her father (General John Newton, US Army Engineer who planned the demolition described in this news article and its accompanying cartoons), pushing the button of a detonator while surrounded by adults (a depiction of the detonation of Flood Rock), the second is a panorama of the Harlem River, the third depicts two men running away (a depiction of the two last men to leave the island before it was destroyed), the fourth depicts an explosion as seen from New York City (specifically Ninety-Second Street). The fi

Image of Bishop Potter's Funeral. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Bishop Potter's Funeral. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A portrait of Reverend Horatio Potter, Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of New York. The cartoon accompanies a story about his death and funeral.

Image of Blaine's Fateful Vision The Night Before His Bosworth Field. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Blaine's Fateful Vision The Night Before His Bosworth Field. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

James G. Blaine wakes up and screams in terror as he is confronted by various allusions to his past political scandals, depicted as demons, ghosts, and bats. The left side of the cartoon is shrouded in darkness and covered with webs, gradually becoming lighter towards the right side until the background becomes pure white, with a praying angel and a ghost labeled "Know-Nothing" (a defunct nativist party) on the far right. The cartoon satirizes Blaine's corrupt dealings and compares him to Richard III in Shakespeare's eponymous play, where Richard is haunted in his dreams by the his victims on the night before the Battle of Bosworth Field, where he ultimately died.

Image of "Blind Man's Buff" With The Boodlers. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

"Blind Man's Buff" With The Boodlers. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Several anti-corruption politicians (William Owen O'Neill and Isaac Pearson among them) lead Justice towards corrupt politician Jacob Sharp. In the background, several politicians carrying sleds in front of a cabin labeled "Canadian Refuge" stare at the group. The cartoon satirizes crackdowns on corruption and fugitive politicians in Canada.

Image of Burial of Bishop Potter. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Burial of Bishop Potter. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

(Page 8) A large crowd gathers around an Episcopalian cathedral. The cartoon accompanies a story about the burial of Bishop Horatio Potter.

Image of Chief Justice Waite Administering The Oath. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Chief Justice Waite Administering The Oath. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Grover Cleveland places a hand on a Bible and swears the presidential oath of office. The bible is held up by Chief Justice Morrison Waite, and Cleveland is surrounded by his cabinet. A large crowd is gathered behind them. The cartoon depicts Cleveland taking the oath of office as he was inaugurated as president in 1885.

Image of Embarked In The Enterprise And Moving Westward. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Embarked In The Enterprise And Moving Westward. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

James G. Blaine, standing in a sinking ship, looks up in dismay at a storm labeled "Popular Opinion". Most of the cargo in the ship has labels relating to his various corruption scandals - a barrel has a dollar sign, one of the crates says "Bonds", another reads "Spoils", the anchor reads "Little Rock" (a reference to the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad Companies, a company through which he received large sums of bribe money), and a broken paddle reads "Lost Power". Two crude metal patches are on the ship's stern - "1876" and "1880", both references to his failed runs in the 1876 and 1880 presidential elections. The cartoon satirizes Blaine's crashing popularity due to his corrupt practic

Image of Exultant Boston---The Modern Athens And Her Baseball Prince. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Exultant Boston---The Modern Athens And Her Baseball Prince. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

A small crowd parades some athletes in Boston, while some older people look on in shock. The cartoon satirizes the rising popularity of sports in Boston, which was traditionally considered the intellectual capital of the United States.

Image of FINIS, J. G. B.---November 4th, 1884 - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

FINIS, J. G. B.---November 4th, 1884 - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

An alligator (labeled "Monopoly Party") lies dead, belly-up. The shoes of someone (most likely James G. Blaine) stick out of its mouth. The dead alligator lies next to a pool labeled "Corruption" and a top hat, umbrella ("Rum Romanism & Rebellion", an inflammatory anti-Democrat slogan from the 1880's), and a book ("'My' Prayers for Blaine"). The sun sets in the distance. The cartoon satirizes the Blaine and the Republican Party's corrupt reputations and alleged pro-monopoly sentiments during the 1884 presidential election, and declares the end of James G. Blaine's political career due to the victory of his opponent, Grover Cleveland.

Image of Guarding The Party Fold. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Guarding The Party Fold. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

Republican politician John A. Logan stands at the gates of a fence, holding a stick labeled "My Tribune" and brandishing it at several sheep with the heads of politicians or journalists (two are labeled "NY Times" and "Harpers Weekly". Many other sheep stand behind Logan. The fence reads "Republican Fold" and has a sign that says "No Mugwumps Need Apply"; one of the planks reads "Break of 1884". The cartoon satirizes the Republican Party's internal divison due to the "Mugwump" faction, a coalition of anti-corruption Republicans who voted against their party's interests due to its promotion of corrupt practices and candidates, most notably James G. Blaine as the Republican candidate for the 18