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Viewing: Gribayedoff, Valerian

Gribayedoff, Valerian

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Image of A Political Comedy In Three Acts. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

A Political Comedy In Three Acts. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

The cartoon is divided into three panels. The first panel (Act I.---"Injured Innocence." Did Not Get a Single Vote in the Democratic Convention.) depicts Massachusetts Governor Benjamin Butler storming out of a room ("Chicago Convention"). His forehead is marked "For Sale C. O. D.". The second panel (Act II.---"The Plot Thickens." "How Much Cash and Plunder Will You Give Me?") depicts Butler sitting in a room and colluding with several other politicians (William Eaton Chandler, Stephen Belton Elkins, George Maxwell Robeson, and many others, including politician-turned newspaper editor Charles A. Dana, who wrote the ostensibly independent New York City "The Sun", but is depicted in this cartoo

Image of Mistaking The Light; Or, The Result Of Political Color-Blindness. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

Mistaking The Light; Or, The Result Of Political Color-Blindness. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

Several unidentified Republican politicians (James G. Blaine among them) cling to a sinking steamboat and scream in terror. Off to the right is a buoy labeled "Democracy", and a shark labeled "Obscurity" moves menacingly towards the ship. The cartoon satirizes the Republican Party's internal divisiveness, reputation for corruption, and immense loss of political influence around the 1884 presidential election.

Image of Seeing Stars. Where The Magnetic Man Slipped Up. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

Seeing Stars. Where The Magnetic Man Slipped Up. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

James G. Blaine trips and falls inside the outline of the state of Ohio. He is covered in text relating to his various corrupt practices and other alleged character flaws and has a speech bubble that reads "D--- Mullig---!". The words "WEST. VA." are inside the outline. To Blaines left are five stars with text inside of them: "Indiana Dem", "New York Dem", "N.J. Dem", "Conn Dem", and "153 Votes Certain For CLEVELAND in the SOUTH". Above Blaine are five other stars with text in them inside a cloud that reads "In Doubt": "Kansas", "Wiscon.", "Mich", "Ill", and "Iowa". The cartoon satirizes Blaine's failure to win votes in several states he claimed he would win.

Image of Society People at a "First Night" in Wallack's New Theatre. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

Society People at a "First Night" in Wallack's New Theatre. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

(Supplement 2). The cartoon depicts actor John Lester Wallack on stage, conductor Lewis F. Baker leading the theatre's orchestra, and the audience, which is comprised of much of New York City's high society of the time. Notable figures include diplomat and animal rights' activist Henry Bergh, tobacco manufacturer Pierre Lorrilard, socialite Oliver DeLancey Kane, banker and philanthropist Darius Ogden Mills, neurologist and former Surgeon General William A. Hammond, railroad executive Sidney Dillon, several judges, author William Winter, railroad magnate Jay Gould, and many others. The cartoon depicts several important political, business, and social figures of late 19th century New York City

Image of The Feast Of The Aldermanic Vultures. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

The Feast Of The Aldermanic Vultures. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

Several vultures with the heads of various New York City Aldermen sit on tree branches and clutch shreds of paper with numbers on them (presumably indicating the amount of money acquired from corrupt dealings). In the center is a horse's skeleton labeled "The Poor Old City", and in the background stands New York City Hall. The cartoon satirizes the corruption suroounding the Broadway railway project in New York City, perpetrated by the upper house of the city's then bicameral legislature.

Image of The Flesh-Pots Of Plunder - Gribayedoff, Valerian

The Flesh-Pots Of Plunder - Gribayedoff, Valerian

Benjamin Franklin Butler, Governor of Massachusetts and Greenback Party candidate, wearing a woman's dress and clutching an oversized spoon in one hand and James G. Blaine on his lap, sits in front of a stove with three pots. The steam rising from the pots contains the faces of various politicians and allusions to several corruption scandals. The cartoon satirizes Butler's alleged corrupt dealings and attempts to win the Democratic nomination in the 1884 presidential election.

Image of The Great Wilson--Astor Nuptials. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

The Great Wilson--Astor Nuptials. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

A large crowd gathers for a wedding in the Astor family's picture gallery. Three portraits and a coat of arms are in each corner of the cartoon: the bride, Caroline Schermerhorn "Carrie" Astor (top left), Caroline Webster Schermerhorn Astor (top right), John Jacob Astor (bottom left), and the Astor crest and coat-of-arms (bottom right). A few other prominent members of New York City's high society appear as well: tobacco manufacturer Pierre Lorillard IV, Colonel Delancey Astor Kane, Senator Lispenard Steward, Peter Marie, General John Watts de Peyster, Robert Fulton Cutting, John Jacob Astor III, Robert Ray Hamilton, New York National Guard General Lloyd Aspinwall, lawyer John Jay, James M. V

Image of The Kind Of One-Eyed Justice We Have In New York. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

The Kind Of One-Eyed Justice We Have In New York. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

A laborer deposits some coins into a large crate labeled "City Taxes". Justice, peeking under her blindfold, holds a sword labeled "Justice" over the man's head while passing money to a rich fat man. The fat man stands in a large safe filled with money bags labeled "Personal Property". In the background, past a chasm, several richly-dressed men hold up signs labeled "Canada: The Defaulters' Refuge.", "We Got Here All The Same.", and "We Are Safe." The cartoon protests corrupt misuse of municipal tax money in New York City, millionaires' ability to circumvent taxation, and the ease of escaping prosecution for stealing public funds by fleeing to Canada.

Image of The Royal Feast Of Belshazzar Blaine And The Money Kings. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

The Royal Feast Of Belshazzar Blaine And The Money Kings. - McDougall, Walter, 1858-1938

James G. Blaine, alongside many other politicians and industrialists (most notably Cornelius Vanderbilt), sits at a massive feast table. The foods all have labels alluding to political patronage and corruption ("Gould Pie", "Monopoly Soup", "Lobby Pudding", "Navy Contract", and "Patronage Cake"). The cartoon satirizes Blaine's corrupt dealings and favormongering with industrialists to win the 1884 presidential election.

Image of The White-Feathered Knight. How a Twenty-Year Teetolaler Dodged a Vote on Prohibition. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

The White-Feathered Knight. How a Twenty-Year Teetolaler Dodged a Vote on Prohibition. - Gribayedoff, Valerian

James G. Blaine skulks away while clutching a book titled "20 Years A Teetotaler", with a white plume (indicating cowardice) in his hat. He looks indecisive. Behind him is a large Prohibitionist demonstration, and a few men dragging a drunk man away. The cartoon satirizes Blaine's decision to abstain from voting for a Prohibition-oriented Constitutional Amendment in Congress in spite of his previous support of the Temperance movement and promise to vote for their favored amendment.