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Viewing: Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

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All on hobbies, gee up, gee ho! - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Reilly 1838-1 Printed and Publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Courtlandt St., NY Library of Congress Reference Numbers: # Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-19195 (b&w film copy neg.) LC-USZC4-8005 (color film copy transparency) Call Number: PC/US - 1838.C619, no. 19 (B size) [P&P]

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All the West Going for Matty - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

A Whig cartoon spoofing Democratic claims of Western support for Van Buren during the election of 1840. Signed with monogram EWC. Pulished by John Childs, 90 Nassau St., N.Y.\ Library of Congress Reference Number: Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-792 (b&w film copy neg.) Call Number: PC/US - 1840.C619, no. 25 (B size) [P&P]

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Caucus on the surplus bill. - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone Exhibit at William Oxley Thompson Library, December 19, 2005 thru January 19, 2005. Publisher: H.R. Robinson Clay ridicules President Andrew Jackson (right) and his allies, Vice President martin (Matty) Van Buren (left) and Jackson's legal advisor and former Secretary of the Treasury Roger B. Taney (center) for their reluctant support of the Surplus Bill. The bill directed surplus federal funds gained from land sales in the west to be distributed among the states. Clay implies that Jackson, who initially opposed the bill, folded under popular pressure and the realization that the Whigs in Congress had the votes to ov

Image of Charles Riviere Herard - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Charles Riviere Herard - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. AC Y9 10a is recto of piece. In 1843, Charles Riviere Herard led a successful rebellion against Haitian President-for-Life Jean Pierre Boyer. Herard became President of Haiti, but was ousted from power by another revolution only a year later.

Image of Executive mercy/Marcy and the Bambers - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Executive mercy/Marcy and the Bambers - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. Irishmen John Bamber, Sr. and his son, James Bamber fled to the U.S. under suspicion of murdering an Irish policemen. Governor William L. Marcy decided to turn them over to the British consul for extradition, angering the immigrant community of New York. During Marcy's campaign for governor, his opponents ridiculed him over a list of expenses he had submitted for reimbursement while he was a judge. the list included "mending work done to pantaloons...50 cents." He was thereafter frequently portrayed with a "50cent" patch on his pants. P

Image of Going Down Going Up - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Going Down Going Up - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Lithograph published by J. Childs at 90 Nassau St. New York. Depicts the loss of Martin Van Buren in the election of 1840 to William Henry Harrison. Van Buren, his Vice President Richard Johnson, and supporters Francis Blair and John Calhoun are in a carriage barreling towards Kinderhook (Van Buren's home) driven by newspaper publisher Amos Kendall. Various Democratic party polticians urge Kendall to stop the coach, as well as chasing a ball rolling down the hill emblazoned with "Facilis descensus Averni" (adapted from Virgil's "Facilis descensus Averno," or "the descent to hell is easy"). A procession of Whigs with various flags chronicoling William Henry Harrison's achievements march toward

Image of I say, this isn't the road to Philadelphy, honey, is it? - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

I say, this isn't the road to Philadelphy, honey, is it? - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Racist caricature simultaneously mocking and condoning the pretentiousness and bigotry of early 19th century Philadelphia Quakers toward their "social inferiors." On a Philadelphia road in front of a small home with an open picket fence and a visitor arriving on horseback, a raggedly dressed dark skinned traveler with buck teeth, possibly an Irishman or African American, asks a rotund Quaker man and his attractive prim and proper daughter, "I say, this isn't the road to Philadelphy, honey, is it?" The father responds indignantly to the "Friend," that he is not only asking a question, but also telling a lie, and of course it is the road. Commentary from the Library Company of Philadelphia

Image of John and Dad in a bad fix - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

John and Dad in a bad fix - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. The Wilmot Proviso was an amendment to a bill introduced in Congress to give President Tyler $2,000,000 to deal with the issue of the Texas territory and a possible war with Mexico. David Wilmot's amendment would have prohibited slavery in any territory that was acquired form Mexico. Because the Wilmot Proviso brought the issue of slavery to the forefront, it caused the entire bill to fail. Martin Van Buren's son, John Van Buren (right) was a gifted orator and a leader of a faction of New York Democrats known as "barnburners." They took up the

Image of Major Joe Bunker's last parade, or the fix of a senator and his 700 Independents - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Major Joe Bunker's last parade, or the fix of a senator and his 700 Independents - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 through March 19, 2006. This cartoon was created in the wake of the business and bank failures called the Panic of 1837. It is one of Clay and Robinson's few pro-Van Buren cartoons, predicting his eventual triumph over the disloyal faction of his party led by Nathaniel Tallmadge. Senator Nathaniel P. Talmadge (center) appears in the cartoon as Major Joe Bunker, a fictional character created by playwright James Hackett for his comic play Down East, or the Militia Muster. Although inexperienced and incompetent in the real battle, Major Bunker was devoted to d

Image of Political game of brag, Shew of hands - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Political game of brag, Shew of hands - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Andrew Donnelly, publisher. Formed part of Drawn on Stone Exhibit at William Oxley Thompson Library, December 19, 2005 - March 19, 2006. Publisher: Andrew Donnelly Presidential candidates play a game of three-card brag, an early version of poker, for the "Presidential Ante". During the campaign, Zachary Taylor, a hero of the Mexican American war, won the Whig nomination over Henry Clay. Current President James K. Polk decided not to run for re-election while Senator Lewis Cass became the Democratic candidate. This cartoon was most likely created after the Whigs chose Taylor at their convention on June 9 but before Martin Van Buren unexpectedly em

Image of Settin' on a rail. - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Settin' on a rail. - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. Clay depicts President Martin Van Buren being pulled in different directions by opposing factions within the Democratic Party. The cartoon was published as a policy makers attempted to decide how to respond to the economic upheavals known as the Panic of 1837. Thomas Hart Benton (left), a Democratic Senator from Missouri, advocated a "hard-money" fiscal policy, meaning that paper currency must be backed by gold. Benton worked to return gold coins to circulation and insisted on receiving his salary in gold coins. Former President Andrew

Image of The death of old Tammany and his wife Loco Foco - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

The death of old Tammany and his wife Loco Foco - Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857

Purchased with William J. Studer endowment. Formed part of Drawn on Stone exhibit at William Oxley Thompson library, December 19, 2005 thru March 19, 2006. New Yorkers elected the fist Whig mayor and Common Council in the municipal elections of 1837. The city had previously been controlled by the Tammany faction of the Democratic party, represented here as a Native-American warrior. Locofoco was a popular nickname for the Equal Rights party, which split from the Tammany Democrats in 1835. Tammany Democrats attempted to force the radical faction from a New York nominating meeting by shutting off the gas lamps, but the dissenters simply used a new kind of self-igniting friction match called l